Safety – Granite Ridge Energy

Safety permit stations streamline maintenance

Granite Ridge Energy 
Owned by Granite Ridge Energy LLC
Operated by NAES Corp 

Challenge. Our plant issues multiple safety permits for safe work, confined space, and hot work to contractors and employees during routine maintenance and major outages which must be maintained at the work location. These permits identify hazards and controls for each job so that all workers are informed and work is conducted in a safe manner.

Permits must remain visible and as close to the work area as possible. In the past, permits have been difficult to locate and sometimes end up in tool boxes, on top of equipment, taped to a wall, or thrown in the trash. These practices have impeded work efficiency while workers hunt for either current permits or look for expired permits at the end of the shift.

Solution. Operator-designed and -implemented safety permit stations that he strategically placed at each piece of major equipment so that permits can be prominently displayed. Some stations are permanent while others will be used only for outage events. Each station is boldly colored and accommodates all of the required safety permits (Fig 5). Confined space permits are attached to a clip board for easy sign in and sign out.

Results. The installation of the safety permit stations in fixed designated areas has not only raised awareness of the work hazards and controls but has increased the efficiency of issuing and collecting safety permits. Contractors know where to find permits for daily safety briefings and know where to return permits that have been removed for verification. For plant employees, it allows expeditious retrieval of expired permits at shift change and quick renewal so that work continues with minimal interruption. In addition, inspection of permits by safety officers and supervisors is more efficient.

Permits must remain visible and as close to the work area as possible. In the past, permits have been difficult to locate and sometimes end up in tool boxes, on top of equipment, taped to a wall, or thrown in the trash. These practices have impeded work efficiency while workers hunt for either current permits or look for expired permits at the end of the shift.